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Lucie Hazen joined the Center for Ocean Solutions in February 2011 as a research analyst. To date, she has focused on coordinating interdisciplinary working groups and co-organized the Center's Ocean Policy course in summer 2011.  Current working groups are synthesizing available research and examining effects of climate change on coral reefs, climate change on pelagic predators and coastal hypoxia in the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem. Ultimately, the working groups will offer policy recommendations for successful management of critical ecosystem services.

Before joining the Center, Lucie managed several marine research and conservation projects with policy applications at Duke University Marine Lab.  In her six years at Duke, she served as a liaison between principal investigators, research scientists, administrators, subcontractors and funders. With experience in project management and oversight, including monitoring budgets and milestones, coordinating team research goals, leading reporting efforts, facilitating communications, and organizing symposia and stakeholder meetings, she brings a strong skill set to support the Center's goals and initiatives.

Lucie received a B.S. in biology from the University of Washington, where she also earned a M.S. from the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences.  Her academic background is in ecology and fisheries biology, and she has extensive experience in field research and project management.

Contact Information:
Email: ljhazen@stanford.edu
Phone: (206) 850-8695

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Liz joined the Center as the first early career fellow in science communication in August 2013.  She worked closely with the science communication program lead and communications team.  Liz is passionate about communicating effectively with other researchers, managers and policy makers in an interdisciplinary approach to marine science and conservation.

Liz completed her Ph.D. at Stanford University in 2013.  Her research focused on the cellular and molecular biology of the ecological relationship between coral and its algal symbionts.  She earned her B.A. in biology at Williams College in Massachusetts and worked as a laboratory technician at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology.  Liz’s research has been global, with projects based in the United States, Australia, the Caribbean, the western Pacific and Germany.  Liz left the Center in 2014 for a full time research position in Germany.

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Laura Good is the education manager for the Center for Ocean Solutions. Originally from the UK, Laura’s background is in Marine Resource Management and Informal Science Education. Laura earned her BS in ocean science from the University of Plymouth (UK), and both her MS in marine resource management and PhD in science education from Oregon State University. Her research interests center on marine education, scientist engagement in education and outreach, and professional development for informal educators, where her doctoral work focused on the interpretive practice of science center docents as they communicate science to the public. Laura specializes in free choice learning, a term used to describe learning that takes place in our everyday lives, where we have choice and control over the learning opportunities at hand.

Before joining the Center, Laura most recently worked as a educational research assistant for Oregon Sea Grant at Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, OR. There, Laura helped design marine science exhibits and develop remote camera technologies to study how people learn in museum environments as part of their 5 year $2.2 million NSF-funded cyberlab project. Laura has also worked as an educational evaluator for COSEE Pacific Partnerships , focusing on scientist engagement with adult volunteer audiences at both Oregon Coast Aquarium and in the Oregon Coastal Master Naturalist Program. As an ocean education specialist, she has developed a variety of K-12 ocean science curriculum and day camp programs for Oregon State University’s Pre-College Education Programs. Prior to her graduate studies, Laura was a Summer Camp Program Director and Naturalist for the YMCA of Greater New York, and even worked briefly in the cruise ship industry as youth staff for Royal Caribbean.

Contact Information:
Email: lhgood@stanford.edu
Phone: (office) 831-333-2093

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Larry Crowder is an affiliated researcher at the Center for Ocean Solutions.  He is also a professor of biology at Hopkins Marine Station and a senior fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, both part of Stanford University.  Previously, he was the Science Directer of the Center for Ocean Solutions and a Stephen Toth Professor of Marine Biology at Duke University. 

Dr. Crowder's research centers on predation and food web interactions, mechanisms underlying recruitment variation in fishes, population and food web modeling in conservation biology, and interdisciplinary approaches to marine conservation. He has studied food web processes in both freshwater and marine ecosystems, and has used observational, experimental, and modeling approaches to understand these interactions in an effort to improve management. He was principal investigator for a number of large interdisciplinary research projects including the South Atlantic Bight Recruitment Experiment (SABRE), OBIS SEAMAP (Spatial Ecological Analysis of Megavertebrate Animal Populations), and Project GLOBAL (Global Bycatch Assessment of Long-Lived Species). He has also directed and participated in a number of research, analysis, and synthesis groups at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) and for the National Research Council’s Ocean Studies Board.

His recent research has focused on marine conservation, including research on bycatch, spatial ecological analysis, nutrients and low oxygen, sustainable seafood, ecosystem-based management, marine spatial planning, and governance. He is a AAAS Fellow and was awarded Duke University’s Scholar/Teacher of the year award in 2008-2009.

Contact Information:
Email: larry.crowder@stanford.edu

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Kevan was an early career science fellow working with the Center for Ocean Solutions’ Land-Sea Interactions focal area. He completed his Ph.D. in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at Stanford University under Professor Alexandria Boehm (link). His dissertation focused on the fate and transport of fecal indicator bacteria and pathogens at the land-sea interface. In particular, Kevan examined beach sands as a non-point, diffuse source of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) to coastal waters, determining the persistence of FIB and human pathogens in beach sands and the mechanisms by which they are transported from beach sands to coastal waters.

In partnership with MBARI, his work with the Center focused on testing the use of MBARI's Microfluidics Block (MFB) fitted to an Environmental Sample Processor (ESP), with the goal to develop rapid detection techniques for the presence and sources of coastal pollutants.  Kevan also helped develop concepts for the Center's broader Land-Sea Interactions focal area.

Kevan holds a B.S. in civil engineering from California State Polytechnic University, Pomona and an M.S. from the environmental engineering and science program at Stanford. Before entering college, he worked as a commercial and sportfishing captain in Southern California. He left the Center for a full time position at MBARI in 2014, and continues to colloborate as an affiliated researcher.

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Jesse Port joined the Center for Ocean Solutions as an early career science fellow in January 2013. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Washington School of Public Health, where he was an investigator within the Pacific Northwest Center for Human Health and Ocean Studies. His research focused on the application of emerging genomic tools and technology for public health surveillance of coastal environments. Prior to this, Jesse completed a master's in the University of Washington’s School of Marine and Environmental Affairs where he focused on aquaculture practices and policy and its relevance to food security. At COS, he combines his scientific and marine policy backgrounds in his work on the Center's Land-Sea Interactions focal area.

Contact Information:
Email: jport@stanford.edu

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John N. (“Jack”) Kittinger was an early career social science fellow with a background as a human geographer and coastal ecologist with broad interests in understanding and advancing solutions to complex problems that face society and the ocean environment. His research explores how social, economic and cultural factors influence the ways in which people use, perceive and govern natural resources, with a particular emphasis on using applied social science to inform environmental management, planning and policy. He has extensive experience coordinating multidisciplinary teams in cross-cutting research and frequently works with other researchers on social-ecological systems research.  Many of Kittinger’s research projects have focused on applying the results of basic research to community planning and management, and he often collaborates with scientists, managers and community stakeholders in knowledge-to-action partnerships to bridge science to policy and practice.  His current research focuses on linking ecosystem services and food security to community well-being, collaborative planning and resource co-management, and social resilience and vulnerability to environmental and social change.  Kittinger works primarily in Hawai‘i, the Pacific Islands and the Asia-Pacific region.

Jack Kittinger is a council member representing research on the advisory council of the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary. He received his Ph.D. from the Department of Geography at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, his M.S. in marine science and environmental studies from the University of San Diego and his B.S. in biology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  Jack left the Center in 2014 for a position as director of the Hawai'i Fish Trust.

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Hoyt is the founding director of SmartFish (please link to www.smartfish.mx), a social enterprise based in La Paz, México that incentivizes more responsible artisanal fishing. Previously, Peckham directed Proyecto Caguama, partnering with fishers, managers, and scientists from Mexico, Cuba, Japan, and the Indo Pacific to reduce bycatch of ocean wildlife while maintaining fishing livelihoods. Combining participatory research with social marketing, Peckham and colleagues empowered fishermen and other stakeholders to spare thousands of endangered sea turtles per year in Mexico and Japan, among other outcomes.

His experience as a captain, diver, fisherman, and underwater cameraman has contributed to his effectiveness in developing sustainability solutions with marine resource users of Latin America, the Northwest Atlantic, Caribbean, Polynesia, and Japan. Hoyt is a 2014 Pew Marine Fellow, a visiting fellow with the Center for Ocean Solutions, a member of the IUCN Marine Turtle Specialist Group, serves as a technical expert for the United Nations Environment Program, and consults internationally on augmenting the sustainability of artisanal fisheries. A native New Englander, Peckham majored in biology and English literature at Bowdoin College and earned his Ph.D. in evolutionary ecology from the University of California at Santa Cruz.

Contact Information:
Email: peckham@stanford.edu, hoyt@smartfish.mx

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Eric Hartge joined the Center as a research and curriculum development intern in November 2010 before becoming a research analyst in July 2011 and then the senior research analyst in November 2013. In the summer of 2015 he was promoted to Research Development Manager. He specializes in organizational management and project portfolio development. He also helps decision-makers plan for a changing ecosystem by advising them on coastal adaptation strategies based in the preservation of natural features.

His current projects include a collaborative effort with the Natural Capital Project and Stanford Law School using the spatial analysis tool "InVEST" to incorporate multiple benefits from natural habitats in decision processes regarding coastal adaptation planning throughout California. In addition, Eric is developing and implementing a revised project portfolio management approach for the Center.

Eric previously worked with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation as the education program manager for Baltimore Harbor with a focus on the human impact on the water quality and fisheries of the Chesapeake Bay. This followed extensive experience in environmental education in the Leeward Islands, Mexico, Costa Rica and Hawai’i. He also gained enough sea time aboard research ships with the Sea Education Association to earn a USCG Near Coastal Master's and Ocean Mate's License.

Eric received his M.S. in environmental sciences and policy from Johns Hopkins University and his B.S. in marine biology from the College of Charleston. His professional and academic experience includes estuarine science, natural resource management, stakeholder engagement, project management, portfolio management, environmental education, decision analysis, data visualization, grant writing, project portfolio management and environmental education. Eric holds certificates in Advanced Project Management, Strategic Decision and Risk Management and Decision-Making for Climate Change.

Contact Information:
Email: ehartge@stanford.edu

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Elodie is a research analyst here at the Center for Ocean Solutions where she studies coupled human-natural systems as a way to inform policies and solve issues facing the oceans and coastal communities. When she first joined the Center for Ocean Solutions team as an intern in 2012, she collaborated with a group of international scholars to explore the use of social data in ocean and coastal management and ways to better integrate the human dimensions into planning and decision-making. Since 2013, when Elodie was hired as a research analyst, she has been working with various stakeholders both locally in California and internationally, to incorporate lessons learned, best practices and innovative ideas to improve sustainability in small-scale fisheries.

Elodie is a French native. She completed her college career at the University of Paul Valery-Montpellier III in France where she earned her Bachelors of Arts in three languages, English, Spanish and Chinese, applied to law, policy and economics. She went on to complete her Masters of Arts in Ocean and Coastal Management, completing a well-rounded education fully preparing her for an interdisciplinary career solving issues in the marine environment.

Elodie has immersed herself in a challenging field, determined to bridge two distinct but overlapping dimensions to improve the resilience of coastal communities and the health of the world’s oceans. In her spare time, Elodie enjoys doing multiple types of art, including painting, and connecting that artwork to the work she does in the marine realm. She also thoroughly loves traveling and the outdoors.

Contact Information:
Email: elecornu@stanford.edu

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