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Fiorenza Micheli is a marine ecologist and conservation biologist conducting research and teaching at the Hopkins Marine Station of Stanford University, where she is also the David and Lucile Packard Professor of Marine Science and the Director, with Jim Leape, of Center for Ocean Solutions (www.centerforoceansolutions.org). Micheli’s research focuses on the processes shaping marine communities and incorporating this understanding in the management and conservation of marine ecosystems. Her current research projects investigate social and ecological drivers of the resilience of small-scale fisheries to climatic impacts in Baja California, Mexico, the ecological and socioeconomic impacts of coastal hypoxia and ocean acidification in the California Current large marine ecosystem, the ecological role and spatial ecology of parrotfish and reef sharks in the coral reefs of the Pacific Line Islands, the effects of ocean acidification on seagrass, rocky reef and kelp forest communities, and the performance and management of marine protected Areas in the Mediterranean Sea. She is a Pew Fellow in Marine Conservation, a fellow of the California Academy of Sciences, and senior fellow at Stanford’s Woods Institute for the Environment.

Contact Information:
Email: micheli@stanford.edu
Phone: (831) 655-6251
Website: http://micheli.stanford.edu/

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Elliott Hazen’s research interests span oceanography and fisheries ecology to climate change modeling, specifically examining marine species-habitat relationships, predator-prey dynamics and climate projections on marine top predator biodiversity. His publications address a range of topics from fine-scale foraging ecology of top predators to modeling the effects of climate change on top predator habitat and biodiversity. In addition, he has co-authored papers reviewing ecosystem management and human dimensions, and he is currently working on creating ecosystem indicators for the California Current large marine ecosystem. He received his doctorate in ecology from Duke University in North Carolina, followed by a National Research Council fellowship with NOAA’s Environmental Research Division in Pacific Grove, California. He is currently a research oceanographer at the University of Hawaii with an appointment at NOAA in Pacific Grove.

Hazen is leading a number of projects examining the foraging ecology of large Pacific predators from blue whales to bluefin tuna to better understand how these animals use their marine environment. In addition to modeling projects, he is involved with ongoing field research in the Gulf of Maine and Southern California. He has visited all seven continents as part of his field research, including Antarctica, the Bahamas and the central tropical Pacific. When not in the office, Hazen is probabaly outdoors where he is expanding his photographic portfolio, scuba diving or both.

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Deborah A. Sivas is an affiliated researcher at the Center for Ocean Solutions and the Luke W. Cole Professor of Environmental Law and Director of the Environmental Law Clinic at Stanford University.

A leading environmental litigator, Deborah A. Sivas ’87 is director of the highly regarded Environmental Law Clinic, in which students provide legal counsel to dozens of national, regional and grassroots nonprofit organizations on a variety of environmental issues. Professor Sivas’s litigation successes include challenging the Bush administration’s gas mileage standards for SUVs and light trucks and holding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency accountable for regulating the discharge of invasive species in ship ballast water. Her current research is focused on the interaction of law and science in the arena of climate change and coastal/marine policy, and the ability of the public to hold policymakers accountable. She is a frequent speaker on these topics.

Prior to assuming the clinic directorship in 1997, Professor Sivas was a partner at Gunther, Sivas & Walthall, an attorney with Earthjustice (formerly Sierra Club Legal Defense Fund), an associate in the environmental practice group at Heller Ehrman, and a law clerk to Judge Judith N. Keep of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California. She currently serves as chair for the board of directors for the Turtle Island Restoration Network. In recognition of her work on behalf of the environment, California Lawyer magazine named Professor Sivas one of its 2008 Attorneys of the Year.

Contact Information:
Email: dsivas@stanford.edu
Phone: (650) 723-0325
Website: http://www.law.stanford.edu/directory/profile/106/Deborah%20A.%20Sivas/

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A leading expert in environmental and natural resources law and policy, Professor Thompson has contributed a large body of scholarship on environmental issues ranging from the future of fisheries and endangered species to the use of economic techniques for regulating the environment.  He is a member of the Science Advisory Board for the United States Environmental Protection Agency and serves as Special Master for the United States Supreme Court in Montana v. Wyoming.  Professor Thompson is chairman of the boards of the the Resources Legacy Fund and the Resources Legacy Fund Foundation, a California trustee for The Nature Conservancy, and a board member of both the American Farmland Trust and the Natural Heritage Institute. Before joining the Stanford Law School faculty in 1986, Professor Thompson was a partner at O’Melveny & Myers in Los Angeles and a lecturer at the UCLA School of Law.  He was a law clerk to the late Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist ’52 (AB ’48, AM ‘48) and Judge Joseph T. Sneed of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.  Professor Thompson received his B.A. from Stanford University and his JD/MBA from Stanford Law School/Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Contact Information:
Email: buzzt@stanford.edu
Phone: (650) 723-2518
Website: http://www.law.stanford.edu/directory/profile/58/

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C. Brock Woodson was an early career science fellow at the Center for Ocean Solutions; he is now an assistant professor at the University of Georgia's College of Engineering.  He continues to work with the Center on the development of a Kelp Forest Observatory and on techniques for model-data comparisons for marine larval dispersal.  His interests include coastal oceanography, biological-physical coupling and behavior effects on dispersal, community structure, biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in marine systems. Woodson uses targeted process studies, observation and modeling techniques to understand how coastal ocean dynamics, turbulence and mixing affect marine biotic interactions. He also works on the integration of marine science and policy, specifically between ocean observation and marine protected area monitoring.

He holds a B.S., and M.S. and a Ph.D. in civil engineering, all from Georgia Institute of Technology. He was a research scientist with the Environmental Fluidics Mechanics Lab at Stanford and an early career fellow at the Center.

Contact Information:
Email: bwoodson@uga.edu
Phone: (404) 307-5331

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Ben Halpern focuses his research at the interface between marine ecology and conservation biology.  His research has addressed a broad range of questions that span local to global scales, including spatial population dynamics, trophic interactions in community ecology, and the interface between ecology and human dynamics, all with the ultimate aim to inform and facilitate conservation and resource management efforts in marine systems.  He received his Ph.D. in marine ecology from UC Santa Barbara and then held a joint post-doctoral fellowship at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) and the Smith Fellowship Program sponsored by The Nature Conservancy.  He is currently an associate research biologist at UC Santa Barbara and the project lead for a research initiative to evaluate and better inform efforts to do ecosystem-based management (EBM) in marine ecosystems around the world.

Halpern has led and participated in several key synthetic research projects that have advanced our understanding of the state of the world’s oceans and the potential for marine reserves to improve ocean condition. In particular he has led the development and mapping of cumulative impact assessments at global and regional scales in marine and freshwater systems.  He has also conducted field expeditions in tropical and temperate systems in the Caribbean, Red Sea, Mediterranean, Indonesia, various parts of the South Pacific, California and Chile.

Contact Information:
Email: halpern@bren.ucsb.edu
Phone: (805) 892-2531

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Barbara A. Block was among the team that developed the original proposal to create the Center for Ocean Solutions. Block received her Ph.D. from Duke University. Her research is focused on how large pelagic fishes utilize the open ocean environment. Investigations of her lab center upon understanding the evolution of endothermic strategies in tunas, billfishes and sharks. Block and her colleagues investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying heat generation and force production in skeletal muscle, the evolution of endothermy, and the physiological ecology of tunas and billfishes. The research in the lab is interdisciplinary, combining physiology, ecology and genetics with oceanography and engineering.

Professor Block and colleagues at the Monterey Bay Aquarium have also established the Tuna Research and Conservation Center, a unique facility that permits physiological research on tunas. They are employing new techniques in wildlife telemetry and molecular genetics to directly examine the short and long-term movement patterns, stock structure and behavior of tunas and billfishes. The fish are highly exploited in international fisheries and effective management of existing biodiversity requires an understanding of their biology and population structure. The Block lab actively engages in research at sea to understand the movements and physiological ecology of tunas and billfishes and to gain insight into the selective advantage of endothermy in fishes.

Block and her colleagues are conducting research with a new type of remote telemetry device, called pop-up satellite archival tags. The tags are essentially computers that record navigational information, body temperature, depth and ambient temperature data. The information gained with these tags will improve our understanding of the biology of these species and increase our knowledge of stock structure. The successful implementation of the novel satellite and archival tag technology has provided marine researchers with new tools for studying inaccessible marine vertebrates.

Professor Block is a recipient of the Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation and the MacArthur Foundation Fellowship.

Contact Information:
Email: bblock@stanford.edu
Phone: (831) 655-6236
Website: http://www-marine.stanford.edu/block.htm

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Alexandria Boehm is working with other researchers to shape the Center's Land-Sea focal area.

Boehm’s primary research area is coastal water quality, and recently she has expanded her research to include activities on sanitation.  Her work on coastal water quality is focused on understanding the sources, transformation, transport and ecology of biocolloids - specifically fecal indicator organisms, pathogens, and phytoplankton, as well as sources and fate of nitrogen and phosphorus. This knowledge is crucial to directing new policies, and management and engineering practices that protect human and ecosystem health along the coastal margin.  Her work on sanitation aims to develop microbial risk assessment models to gain a better understanding of how pathogens are transmitted to humans through their contact with water, feces, and contaminated surfaces.  Boehm’s research is focused on key problems in developed and developing countries.  The goal is to design and test effective interventions and technologies for reducing the burden of infectious disease. Details of current projects can be found at Boehm’s project website

Bohem is a member of the State of California Clean Beach Task Force, and the State of California Ocean Protection Council Science Advisor Team.  She holds a B.S. in engineering and applied science from the California Institute of Technology, and a Master’s and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of California, Irvine.

Contact Information:
Email: aboehm@stanford.edu
Phone: (650) 724-9128
Website: http://www.stanford.edu/~aboehm/website.htm

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Susanne Moser heads a research and consulting firm in Santa Cruz, CA, is a social science research fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment at Stanford University, and a research associate at the University of California, Santa Cruz Institute for Marine Sciences. Previously, she served as a research scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado; served as staff scientist for climate change at the Union of Concerned Scientists; was a research fellow at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and at the Heinz Center in Washington, DC.

Susi's work focuses on adaptation to climate change, vulnerability, resilience, climate change communication, social change, decision support and the interaction between scientists, policy-makers and the public. She is a geographer by training (Ph.D. 1997, Clark University) with an interests in how social science can inform society's responses to this global challenge. She has worked coastal areas, urban and rural communities, with forest-reliant communities, and on human health issues.

Susi contributed to Working Group II of the Nobel prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Fourth Assessment Report, and currently serves as review editor on the IPCC’s Special Report on “Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation.” She has advised the Obama Administration on communication of climate change, evaluated former Vice President Al Gore’s Climate Project on climate change communication, and is a frequent advisor to policy-makers and managers at all levels of government. She is a co-editor with Lisa Dilling (University of Colorado-Boulder) on a ground-breaking 2007 anthology on climate change communication, called Creating a Climate for Change: Communicating Climate Change and Facilitating Social Change (Cambridge University Press). Her work has been recognized through fellowships in the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program, the UCAR Leadership Academy, Kavli Frontiers of Science Program, and the Donella Meadows Leadership Program.

Contact Information:
Email: promundi@susannemoser.com
Website: http://www.susannemoser.com/index.php

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Rebecca Martone is the Center's former assistant director for science and research . She worked to integrate natural and social science with policy and management to inform solutions necessary for healthy and resilient coastal and marine ecosystems.  Rebecca has extensive experience managing large-scale, interdisciplinary teams working on real-world problems. Her research focuses on human-caused changes to marine ecosystems and consequences for ecosystem services on which people depend. She is also the U.S. representative to the North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES) working group on 'Development of Ecosystem Indicators to Characterize Ecosystem Responses to Multiple Stressors.'

Prior to her position at the Center, Rebecca examined the productivity and diversity of kelp forest ecosystems in response to trophic cascades and the consequences for human communities as a postdoctoral researcher at the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability at the University of British Columbia. In addition, she worked with Fisheries and Oceans Canada as the science coordinator for the Pacific North Coast Integrated Management Area (PNCIMA) planning process to develop a framework for examining cumulative effects from human activities to ecosystems in coastal British Columbia.

Rebecca received a Ph.D. from Stanford University in biological sciences where she integrated social and ecological research to inform sustainability of small-scale fisheries. She also holds a master’s degree from Duke University in marine environmental management and a bachelor’s from Northwestern University in environmental sciences.

Contact Information:
Phone: 831-402-2487

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