News & Events

April 10, 2013

In the wake of Superstorm Sandy and other natural disasters, will Americans prepare and invest to minimize the impact of disasters, or deal with storms and rising sea levels after they occur? A new survey commissioned by COS and Stanford Woods reveals the nation's attitude.

April 9, 2013

A study of sea urchins, co-authored by Stephen Palumbi, a professor in marine sciences and the director of Stanford's Hopkins Marine Station, reveals previously unknown adaptive variations that could help some marine species survive in future acidified seas.

April 9, 2013

Stanford scientists have discovered that some purple sea urchins living along the coast of California and Oregon have the surprising ability to rapidly evolve in acidic ocean water.

April 8, 2013

In this paper, Steve Palumbi and co-authors demonstrate that ocean acidification generates striking patterns of genome-wide selection in purple sea urchins (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) cultured under different CO2 levels.

April 8, 2013

Scientists have discovered that sea urchins along California's coast are able to quickly adapt to changing ocean acidification levels. Steve Palumbi explains.

April 5, 2013

COS Visiting Fellow Elliott Hazen and Affiliated Researcher Francisco Chavez shed light on a recent phenomenon of sea lion pups beaching themselves on California's coast.

March 29, 2013

Americans believe climate change is happening but are unwilling to pay to build sea walls and relocate coastal communities, a Stanford University poll released Thursday found.

March 29, 2013

Rising sea levels are a major threat to the U.S. and should be dealt with accordingly--at least, that's what most Americans believe. A new poll conducted by Stanford University researchers reveals that citizens want the nation to prepare for climate change, but don't want the government to pay for it.

March 29, 2013

The overwhelming majority of Americans in a new public opinion poll support stronger building codes to minimize damage from climate-induced sea level rise and extreme weather, but they don’t think taxpayers should foot the bill.

March 28, 2013

An overwhelming majority of Americans is convinced that sea level rise resulting from climate change poses a significant threat to the United States and coastal communities should invest in preparing for the risks, according to a survey released Thursday by Stanford University.